Powershell binary module manifest


This topic describes how to create a module manifest that contains the standard keys by using the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet, and it describes how to manually configure the advanced keys. When you use the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet, you can explicitly specify each parameter. Or, you can use the prompts provided by the cmdlet to set the standard keys of the manifest.

A module manifest is a Windows PowerShell data file. The first procedure shows how to use the cmdlet prompts to set the standard keys and to create the module manifest file. The second procedure explains how to open the module manifest file and set the advanced keys. In most cases, the module manifest can be used by setting only the standard keys. At the prompt, specify the path and file name of the new module manifest.

Enter a path and a file name with a. This parameter is required. Typically, modules are stored under the user folder as shown in the previous paragraph or in the system folder.

In this example, the manifest is created for a powershell binary module manifest located under the user folder. The prompt you receive resembles the following prompt. If you specify the path to an existing file, the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet replaces that file without powershell binary module manifest unless the file is read-only.

The manifest file and the module folder should have the same name, but the module manifest file must have a. To use a variable, include the Path parameter in the command. At the NestedModules prompt, optionally specify any script modules. If no nested modules are specified, as in powershell binary module manifest following example, the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet creates a NestedModules key whose value is an empty list.

The members of the nested modules are imported into the caller's session state only when the root module exports the nested module members explicitly or powershell binary module manifest the root module omits the Export-ModuleMember command. This will export all commands by default, including commands from nested modules. Nested modules are not returned by the Get-Module cmdlet, nor are their members returned by the Get-Command cmdlet.

The files in the NestedModules key of the manifest run in the order in which they are listed. To run a script in the global session state, list the script file name in the ScriptsToProcess key in the manifest.

If no author is specified, the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet creates an Author key whose value is the name of the current user. At the CompanyName prompt, optionally specify the company name or vendor of the module. If the company name or vendor is not specified, the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet creates a CompanyName powershell binary module manifest with a value of "Unknown".

If no copyright information is specified, the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet creates a Copyright key with the following value:. Enter the file name of one script module. When the module is imported, the members that are exported from the root module file are imported into the global session state.

If no root module is specified, the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet creates a ModuleToProcess key with an empty string value. To export members from.

Otherwise, their members are not exported. If a description is not specified, the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet creates a Description key with an empty string value. If no type files are specified, the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet creates a TypesToProcess key whose value is an empty list.

If no formatting files are specified, the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet creates powershell binary module manifest FormatsToProcess key whose value is an empty list. Formatting files are used by Windows PowerShell to define how the members of a.

NET Framework type are displayed. At the RequiredAssemblies prompt, optionally specify any assembly. If no assemblies are specified, the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet creates a RequiredAssemblies key whose value is an empty list.

Windows PowerShell loads the specified assemblies before it processes type and formatting files, before it imports nested modules, or before it imports the root module file that is specified by the ModuleToProcess key. Powershell binary module manifest files are specified, the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet creates a FileList key whose powershell binary module manifest is an empty list.

Then, you can call the Import-Module cmdlet to load the module. Use a text editor such as Notepad to open the module manifest file that was created by the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet. From the following list, select the advanced keys that you need to set, and modify the manifest file as needed. This site uses cookies for analytics, personalized content and ads. By continuing to browse this site, you agree to this use. Office Office Exchange Server.

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This documentation is archived and is not being maintained. How to Write a Module Manifest This topic describes how to create a module manifest that contains the standard keys by using the New-ModuleManifest cmdlet, and it describes how to manually configure the advanced keys.

This is a test module manifest. Version key Specifies the version number of the module. By default, Windows PowerShell enters '1. ID key Specifies an identifier that uniquely identifies the module. Valid versions are 1. Requirements for versions greater than 2. This name is provided by Windows PowerShell. To find the name of a host program, in the program, powershell binary module manifest DotNetFrameworkVersion key Specifies the minimum version of the.

NET Framework that is required by the module. ProcessorArchitecture key Specifies the processor architecture that the module requires. ScriptsToProcess key Specifies script. This could be the powershell binary module manifest session state or, for nested modules, the session state of another module.

You can use these scripts to prepare an environment just as you might use a login powershell binary module manifest. By default, all functions are exported. You can powershell binary module manifest this key to restrict the functions that are exported by the module.

When chaining nested modules, all functions that are exported by a nested module will be exported to the global session state powershell binary module manifest a module in the chain restricts the function by using the FunctionsToExport key. If the manifest also exports aliases for the functions, this key can remove functions whose aliases are listed in the AliasesToExport key, but this key cannot add function aliases to the list.

CmdletsToExport key Specifies the cmdlets that the module exports wildcard characters are permitted. By default, all cmdlets are exported. You can use this key to restrict the cmdlets that are exported by the module. When you are chaining nested modules, all cmdlets that are exported by a nested module will be ultimately exported to the global session state unless a module in the chain restricts the cmdlet by using the CmdletsToExport key.

If the manifest also exports aliases for the cmdlets, this key can remove cmdlets whose aliases are listed in the AliasesToExport key, but this key cannot add cmdlet aliases to the list. By default, all variables are exported. You can use this key to restrict the variables that are exported by the module. When you are chaining nested modules, all variables that are exported by a nested module will be exported to the global session state unless a module in the chain restricts the variable by using the VariablesToExport key.

If the manifest also exports aliases for the variables, this key can remove variables whose aliases are listed in the AliasesToExport key, but this key cannot add variable aliases to the list. By default, all aliases are exported. You can use this key to restrict the aliases that are exported by the module. When you are chaining nested modules, all aliases that are exported by a nested module will be ultimately exported to the global session state unless a module in the powershell binary module manifest restricts the alias by using the AliasesToExport key.

ModuleList key Specifies all the modules powershell binary module manifest are packaged with this module. The hash table can also have an optional ModuleVersion key. The ModuleList key is designed to act as a module inventory. These modules are powershell binary module manifest automatically processed. PrivateData key Specifies any private data that needs to be passed to the root module specified by the ModuleToProcess key. Save the module manifest file. Is this page helpful?

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Systems Engineer with a penchant for PowerShell, science, cooking, information security, family, cookies, and the Oxford comma. A while back, someone mentioned it might be fun to document the PowerShell-module-writing-process. This has been done before, but Powershell binary module manifest figure it would be fun to post my own process, from initial idea through publication on the official PowerShellGallery.

It turns out this is a very common need, and many of the modules we write abstract out these APIs into handy PowerShell functions and modules. If not, be sure to spend some time learning PowerShell before continuing here!

This post will cover my typical formula for writing a module, using the Stack Exchange API as an example. Feel free to browse the PSStackExchange code on your own.

Advanced functions will take you far with PowerShell. But… they have their limits. Here are a few reasons you might bundle your powershell binary module manifest functions in a module:. Doing this from scratch might take you a little time. Thankfully, once you write a module or two, you can quickly get started by copying it and tweaking a few files.

There are many ways to create a module, from slapping a. This might take a few minutes the first time you run through it, but you can borrow and tweak this same scaffolding for each module you write. In fact, you might find or write helper PowerShell modules and tools that simplify this process. This should be pretty straightforward. I ran through the following code to get started.

Basename to avoid hard coding functions to export in the psd1. Once a module is released, I try to add the public powershell binary module manifest to the psd1. Give it a shot! We include a few superficial tests in PSStackExchange. Lastly, we include some usability features. The content of our module is ready to publish. First, we set up our project in AppVeyor by adding appveyor.

We abstract out the calls to Pester in AppVeyor. Our code is now published, and AppVeyor powershell binary module manifest start running powershell binary module manifest build. Lastly, we want to publish our module in the PowerShell Gallerygiving end users with PowerShell 5 a simple way to find and install your module.

Our module is now live on PowerShell Gallery! That was a long post. Thankfully, most of this stuff can be re-used in each module you write. The first and last step take a minute or two each. The module and scaffolding around it can be copied and tweaked, which should only take a few minutes. Most of your time will be spent writing the advanced functions for the module.

The module is published and ready to powershell binary module manifest Looking for further reading? Here are a few references that might come in handy:. This is a major value-add if you do it right and follow PowerShell conventions. Updated links to PSStackExchange to link to a specific point in time.

The powershell binary module manifest version of this project may see updates to illustrate things like PSDeploy. Warren F Systems Engineer with a penchant for PowerShell, science, cooking, information security, family, cookies, and the Oxford comma. Building a PowerShell Module. Community Lightning Demos Quick Hit: Fun with Sorting PSDepend: PowerShell Dependencies Quick Hit:

We have several hundred client machines on campus and each lab of computers need to do something a little different. The main difference is installing and setting default printers. The computers are running our build of Windows 7, because of this, we can't use the PrintManagement module that comes with Windows 8. The code works, you can suggest changes if you see potential bugs, but that's not the point of this powershell binary module manifest.

Anyway, I made a Module Manifest to better document the module, but i'm having trouble using it correctly. Here is the manifest trimmed:. Using the Module Powershell binary module manifest, the Cmdlets aren't being exported correctly, and I can't figure out what I need to do so that they will work. I can always not use Module Manifest, but it seems like this is something that should be easy to do. Those are functions, not Cmdlets.

Cmdlets refer to PowerShell commands that are written in a. NET language usually Cand will be contained in a. Modules that show up as type Manifest seem to just have NestedModules listed, and no root module though that's based on some very quick spot-checking of manifests; I haven't looked at all of them. October 2, at 9: Here is the manifest trimmed: Module manifest for module 'PrinterManagement' Generated by: Anthony Stewart Generated on: Because of this fact, we cannot use the PrintManagement module cmdlets on the Windows 7 lab computers.

As always, any help is appreciated. October 2, at Thanks, moving the "function" names to "FunctionsToExport" powershell binary module manifest it!

Now I get this: That's been bugging me for a couple weeks now. You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Skip to toolbar About WordPress.